Ink Tank - Make words not war Stina Henriksson

Ice swimmer looking happy

Every nationality has their own identifiable characteristics no matter how stereotypical they may sound. As a Finn I hardly recognize these behavioral traits in myself until I’m outside my home country, Finland. With this list you’re sure to never mistake a Finn for anyone else again, especially while traveling or residing abroad…


 

 

1. At first you won’t even spot us because Finns know how to lay low on the communal radar — virtually undetectable. You won’t hear us voicing loud opinions on public transportation.

 

2. But Finns are surely there. We’re super punctual. If an event starts at 10:00 a Finn will be there at 9:40. Tip: If there’s coffee, make it 9:20.

 

 
A digital wristwatch
 

 

3. Finns are the grumpiest looking people in the group. Finns tend to have unreadable facial expressions all while avoiding excessive smiling. If we’re excessively smiling it’s most likely because you just told an inappropriate joke. We love questionable humor. Dark winters = dark humor?

 

4. Finns can be spotted awkwardly hovering around the coffeemaker drinking hideous amounts of coffee, no matter what time of day it is. It’s a way of staying awake during those dark winter months, and a habit we cannot switch off while abroad.

 

A cup of coffee

 

5. Apart from finishing our coffee before you, Finns will also finish their alcoholic beverages before you. A moderate drinker to Finns is a person with a problem to others. Be careful when you challenge a Finn to drink — you will lose and most likely be humiliated.

 

 

A glass of whiskey

 

6. Don’t expect an extended amount of emotional small talk. Finns often answer in short and honest bursts after a momentary ponder. Alternatively, we will tell you our whole life story when asked: “how are you?” This is more rare than the first scenario and likely involves booze.

 

7. Finns look unfazed by chilly weather. If it’s above -20C then you won’t see Finns commenting on the cold. You will learn to stop asking us if we’re cold because the answer is always going to be “no.

 

Finnish winter trees

 

8. But when it’s actually cold Finns are really good at dressing themselves. We’ve got all the right clothing for that. There’s no shame in wearing double layers of grandma’s wool mittens, scarves and/or sweaters…layering like a maniac is a must. It should take you over 20 annoying minutes to undress once you’ve come inside, or you’re not dressed warm enough.

 

Wool sweater

 

If you happen to mistake someone for a Finn abroad even with this helpful list, then you failed. But hey, it’s a good start and they’re probably an awesome person anyway.

 

 
Edited by Michele Lawrence




The post 8 surefire ways to spot a Finn abroad appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Thomas Nybergh

Yellow autumn leaf on the ground, photo by Tom Woodward

Finland’s climate is notorious for skipping long intermediary periods of warmish spring and fall. Summer turns to… something else pretty quickly. That somefthing else usually happens in September, in Finnish literally “Month of Autumn” (syyskuu).

If you’re out and about in Finnish nature during late September throughout most of October, you might witness ruska. That’s a Finnish word for autumn colored foliage. In many places over the world, ruska puts up quite the show.

But due to the long, dark winter in Finland, ruska really is last call for enjoying nature. Unless you like stumbling around in the cold and dark. Which is totally okay, we’re not judging.

In any case, we went scouting Flickr’s community for some ruska goodness. This writer also pillaged his own archive if Instagram snapshots, for your enjoyment. So, whether you prefer the great outdoors in urban streetscapes or out in the middle of nowhere, we hope we can remind you to at least enjoy a few more strolls outside before the long grey dark sets in.

 

1. If you’re in luck puddles or lakes might remind you to look up at the trees.

 

 

2. Lapland is stunning during ruska.

 

3. But so are all the lush suburbs all around the country. This view is from a high-rise building in Vuosaari in Helsinki.

 

4. I prefer staying in my inner city hoods, around Kallio and Vallila. But not because of some pretense of hipness…

 

5. …but because it’s going to retain a sense of place when ruska is over and fall is at its worst.

 
 

 
 

6. To each their own. But the point is: nature lovers, don’t waste a minute of this.

 

7. Anyway, you can’t get this in the cities.

 

8. However, nothing will stop you from enjoying wild cloud formations wherever you can see the sky.

 

9. Seriously, these skies are quite something.

 
 

 
 

10. Let’s cut the BS though, we were talking about autumn colors, ruska.

 

11. Again, available wherever they haven’t cut down the trees.

 

12. Autumn colors are caused by the process during which chlorophyll levels decrease in leaves.

 

13. Chlorophyll, the bringer of greenery, and an essential component of photosynthesis, is replaced by cork cells as sunlight and wamth decreases.

 

14. Eventually leaves drop. Without photosynthesis, they’re redundant. So, unless you have matching facades, get your nice photos taken while the leaves haven’t yet fallen.

 
 

 
 

15. Eventually, the end result is this: naked trees, with leaves in a slowly decomposing brown mess.

 

16. Luckily, some trees stay green.

 

17. So, if you notice moments post August 15 that pass for summer, be mindful and savor them.

 

18. One week, you’ll be out and about and enjoying everything about your surroundings.

 

19. Then, it’ll suddenly get rainy, in a way that just feels chilling.

 

20. And before you know it, you’ll just forget to enjoy your everyday surroundings. Moving outdoors becomes a tiresome chore, one which requires preparation.

 
 

 
 

21. Sure, those August and September sunsets are quite something.

 

22. They almost make you appreciate the looming darkness.

 

23. But by early November, a handful of pretty sunsets are among the few outposts of sanity you’ll have left. In Helsinki, you’ll miss the show if you don’t leave work between 4 and 5 pm. Farther up north, any typical office gig will leave you out of daylight.

 

24. With my brain chemistry, only something like this furball can force me to leave the house while there’s light around noon on November weekends.

 

25. But of course, outdoorsy people will crawl the forests for some last edible berries or mushrooms.

 

26. Or they’ll be using their inexplicable energy, to take some last sips of whatever magic takes place at summer cottages.

 
 

 
 

27. Make no mistake, to take a photo like this, you’ll need to get our in the middle of nowhere and be prepared for the freezing cold as soon as you’re not in direct sunlight.

 

28. Here, a regular human just sees a weird big rock, maybe with some understanding that the ice age dragged it there. Outdoorsy folks probably measure it up as potential shelter or whatever.

 

29. Personally, I prefer everyday scenes like these, and muttering about things like ugly elevated highway bridges.

 

30. Luckily I can get dramatic shots like this one just a fifteen minute walk away from my house.

 

31. Again, with the clouds.

 
 

 
 

32. And I much prefer to spend the silver hour on my way home.

 

33. When darkness falls, I want to be real close to home.

 

34. This is the kind of nature sightings I like in fall: old NYC style taxis with campaign stickers for Dick Nixon.

 

35. Anyway, time to head out before everything looks like this.

 

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more stories about super Suomi

 

Thomas Nybergh is a writer and producer for Ink Tank Media in Helsinki. He’s really into topics like information security, but he writes about anything. Occasionally, Thomas gets around to sharing photos on Instagram.

Thomas also co-hosts and produces a podcast based on Very Finnish Problems, the social media sensation.




Title image by Tom Woodward

The post Ruska relief: 35 stunning photos of Finland’s autumn colors appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Thomas Nybergh

Tintin and The Brexit Plan: Captain Haddock burning oars and warming his hands in a liferaft

What if we told you there’s this place on the interweb you can go to receive regular updates of the latest, most vicious anti-Brexit memes? Well there is, over at the Twitters, under the account @SoVeryBrexit, or Very Brexit Problems. You can also find the same dank political misery over at Facebook, if that’s your thing.

Here’s a proper, 22-piece family pack of the sick burn they deliver.




 

1.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 




 

5.

 

6.

 

7.

 

8.

 

9.

 

10.

 

11.

 




 

12.

 

13.

 

14.

 

15.

 

16.

 

17.

 




%nbsp;

18.

 

19.

 

20.

 

21.

 

22.

 

Need more? Maybe check out our reactions to the November 2016 US Presidential election?

Weighing your options in Britain? Check out our podcast. Follow one Brit who escaped his homeland’s post-colonial decay and rigid class system for the Nordic, egalitarian winter misery of Finland. Sure, it’s on Apple Podcasts, too.

 

 




The post Daily Fail: 22 vicious anti-Brexit memes to pave your road to isolationism appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Thomas Nybergh

Dirty socks on a pair of sneakers, presumably not related to the xenophobia in Finland following the Turku knife stabbing attack

Turku, Finland’s sixth largest and oldest city, experienced a deadly, Islamism-related act of terrorism last week. You might ask yourself what this has to do with socks and a Facebook hate group. Let’s find out.

Sadly, regressive thinkers across Finnish society are playing straight into the hands of Turku’s knife-wielding assclown and his totalitarian ideology. On the interweb, people are inciting violence against “immigrants” (presumably anyone who isn’t melanin challenged).

Political opportunists in all ranks of government are falling over themselves cackling hysterically for the case of internet mass surveillance, which Finland might be facing due to a dangerous dangerous bill.

 

Screenshot from Finnish sock hate group on Facebook

Someoone’s pleading for a change of a typo in the anti-sock Facebook group’s name

 

Internet nazis and their jihadi brethren

Violence against immigrants is nothing new, and vitriol against non-xenophobics is on the rise on social media. The Turku attack appears to have been targeting women. But curiously enough, Finnish women on the internet are getting threatened by Finnish men. You’d be excused for seeing curious parallels between Islamism and Western “white nationalism”.

In the following tweet, outspoken podcast host and feminist Iris Flinkkilä lists the conspicuously Finnish sounding names. These are people who’ve sent her death threats following anti-racist remarks regarding the Turku attack’s aftermath.

 

 

As reported by Helsingin Sanomat, one of these guys got particularly excited and started the Facebook group “Social movement against terrorism” and… “socks” (Terrorismin ja sukkien vastainen kansanliikeryhmä).

Unfortunately for him, he misspelled the Finnish neologism suvakki, a shortened slur for suvaitsevainen, literally “tolerant person”. The real implication being, that only bad people believe in basic human rights and working against structural oppression.

 

 

 

Don’t diss the spelling, diss the hate

Suffice to say, this edgelord got his social media phenomenon alright. But presumably, he didn’t expect resistant floods of tongue-in-cheek hate speech against socks, sukkia in Finnish.

That’s the the partitive plural form of sukka. In the original sentence, Terrorismin ja sukkien vastainen kansanliikeryhmä, genitive plural is used. Because Finnish grammar is fun like that.

 

Screenshot from Finnish sock hate group on Facebook

Someone’s concerned about a wave of socks reaching Finland’s western border to Sweden, a country known for it’s sock ridden problem suburbs.


 

Shaming people for misspellings is a form of ableism. Spelling mistakes is a common symptom of dyslexia, a thing we, as professional writers, shouldn’t shame people for.

Likewise, implying that racism necessarily is a symptom of  “low intelligence” is extremely rude to loving and caring individuals born with cognitive disabilities. So, we’re just going to sit back and analytical here, without additional puns. Because, let’s face it, screw this human asswipe and his hate.

By the way, does this case make anyone else think of the clown car KKK man from a couple of years back. He certainly put Finland on the map.

 

Authoritarian response to authoritarian attacks

With regard to the Turku attack, we have some additonal thoughts. As is customary with contemporary Islamist terrorism in the West, the threats were known by authorities. With more resources spent on, at a minimum, solid policework, counterintelligence/counterterrorism, with boring, human sources, this, and future attacks could perhaps be avoided.

 

Screenshot from Finnish sock hate group on Facebook

This person forgot white socks in their washing machine, resulting in coloration during the next colored wash. SAD!


 

Internet mass surveillance, on the other hand is expensive, generates lots of false positives, particularly if the purpose is to do real time monitoring of terror threats. Surveillance is also a danger to democracy. Present day internet surveillance offers dangerous tools that Stasi could only have dreamed of.

The real use for internet mass surveillance is to build long-term dossiers on known individuals and to try and understand how other states work. Finland is becoming a nexus of internet traffic entering and leaving Russia, Finland’s beloved neighbor with it’s taiga equivalence of Saddam Hussein at the throne.

This includes Russian companies, like Yandex, building data centers in Finland, thanks to stable conditions and less sucky infrastructure.

People in the intelligence field who are also competent data scientists, are welcome to correct me on this.

 

 

When Western demographies adopt mass surveillance, citizens better sit down to think long and hard about how many paragraphs really protects us from slipping towards a model of China’s insane public-private partnership for “social credit”, combining government surveillance with commercial internet tracking. All in the name of safety, of course.

 

Screenshot from Finnish sock hate group on Facebook

Someone rejoicing about leftists waking up to the threat of socks, as expressed by a rap music video titled “cut your socks”.


 

 

Sock the police?

Finnish police officers sure are granted immunity for petty ethnic profiling. Police are also mandated by law to engage in destructive nonsense like enforcing drug criminalization. Suffice to say that this writer is highly skeptical of glorification of police.

 

 

However, Finnish persons of color enjoy the dubious “privilege” of at least not getting shot for ”offences” like Driving While Black. In fact, Finnish police appears well trained, and is known for avoiding deadly force, which is impressing for a country with plenty of alcohol, guns plus military conscripts trained to use them.

In this case in particular, Police displayed competence: The Turku assailant was stopped by a quick shot in the leg, mere minutes after starting his stabbing spree. During a press conference following the spree, police were careful about disclosing investigative findings prematurely.

But Minister of the Interior, Mrs. Paula Risikko immediately blurted out that the suspect was “foreign looking”. Nice.

 

 

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more super stories


Title image by Quinn Dombrowski

The post Absolutely Socking: Finnish FB group against human rights gets flooded with socks appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Thomas Nybergh

Dirty socks on a pair of sneakers, presumably not related to the xenophobia in Finland following the Turku knife stabbing attack

Turku, Finland’s sixth largest and oldest city, experienced a deadly, Islamism-related act of terrorism last week. You might ask yourself what this has to do with socks and a Facebook hate group. Let’s find out.

Sadly, regressive thinkers across Finnish society are playing straight into the hands of Turku’s knife-wielding assclown and his totalitarian ideology. On the interweb, people are inciting violence against “immigrants” (presumably anyone who isn’t melanin challenged).

Political opportunists in all ranks of government are falling over themselves cackling hysterically for the case of internet mass surveillance, which Finland might be facing due to a dangerous dangerous bill.

 

Screenshot from Finnish sock hate group on Facebook

Someoone’s pleading for a change of a typo in the anti-sock Facebook group’s name

 

Internet nazis and their jihadi brethren

Violence against immigrants is nothing new, and vitriol against non-xenophobics is on the rise on social media. The Turku attack appears to have been targeting women. But curiously enough, Finnish women on the internet are getting threatened by Finnish men. You’d be excused for seeing curious parallels between Islamism and Western “white nationalism”.

In the following tweet, outspoken podcast host and feminist Iris Flinkkilä lists the conspicuously Finnish sounding names. These are people who’ve sent her death threats following anti-racist remarks regarding the Turku attack’s aftermath.

 

 

As reported by Helsingin Sanomat, one of these guys got particularly excited and started the Facebook group “Social movement against terrorism” and… “socks” (Terrorismin ja sukkien vastainen kansanliikeryhmä).

Unfortunately for him, he misspelled the Finnish neologism suvakki, a shortened slur for suvaitsevainen, literally “tolerant person”. The real implication being, that only bad people believe in basic human rights and working against structural oppression.

 

 

 

Don’t diss the spelling, diss the hate

Suffice to say, this edgelord got his social media phenomenon alright. But presumably, he didn’t expect resistant floods of tongue-in-cheek hate speech against socks, sukkia in Finnish.

That’s the the partitive plural form of sukka. In the original sentence, Terrorismin ja sukkien vastainen kansanliikeryhmä, genitive plural is used. Because Finnish grammar is fun like that.

 

Screenshot from Finnish sock hate group on Facebook

Someone’s concerned about a wave of socks reaching Finland’s western border to Sweden, a country known for it’s sock ridden problem suburbs.


 

Shaming people for misspellings is a form of ableism. Spelling mistakes is a common symptom of dyslexia, a thing we, as professional writers, shouldn’t shame people for.

Likewise, implying that racism necessarily is a symptom of  “low intelligence” is extremely rude to loving and caring individuals born with cognitive disabilities. So, we’re just going to sit back and analytical here, without additional puns. Because, let’s face it, screw this human asswipe and his hate.

By the way, does this case make anyone else think of the clown car KKK man from a couple of years back. He certainly put Finland on the map.

 

Authoritarian response to authoritarian attacks

With regard to the Turku attack, we have some additonal thoughts. As is customary with contemporary Islamist terrorism in the West, the threats were known by authorities. With more resources spent on, at a minimum, solid policework, counterintelligence/counterterrorism, with boring, human sources, this, and future attacks could perhaps be avoided.

 

Screenshot from Finnish sock hate group on Facebook

This person forgot white socks in their washing machine, resulting in coloration during the next colored wash. SAD!


 

Internet mass surveillance, on the other hand is expensive, generates lots of false positives, particularly if the purpose is to do real time monitoring of terror threats. Surveillance is also a danger to democracy. Present day internet surveillance offers dangerous tools that Stasi could only have dreamed of.

The real use for internet mass surveillance is to build long-term dossiers on known individuals and to try and understand how other states work. Finland is becoming a nexus of internet traffic entering and leaving Russia, Finland’s beloved neighbor with it’s taiga equivalence of Saddam Hussein at the throne.

This includes Russian companies, like Yandex, building data centers in Finland, thanks to stable conditions and less sucky infrastructure.

People in the intelligence field who are also competent data scientists, are welcome to correct me on this.

 

 

When Western demographies adopt mass surveillance, citizens better sit down to think long and hard about how many paragraphs really protects us from slipping towards a model of China’s insane public-private partnership for “social credit”, combining government surveillance with commercial internet tracking. All in the name of safety, of course.

 

Screenshot from Finnish sock hate group on Facebook

Someone rejoicing about leftists waking up to the threat of socks, as expressed by a rap music video titled “cut your socks”.


 

 

Sock the police?

Finnish police officers sure are granted immunity for petty ethnic profiling. Police are also mandated by law to engage in destructive nonsense like enforcing drug criminalization. Suffice to say that this writer is highly skeptical of glorification of police.

 

 

However, Finnish persons of color enjoy the dubious “privilege” of at least not getting shot for ”offences” like Driving While Black. In fact, Finnish police appears well trained, and is known for avoiding deadly force, which is impressing for a country with plenty of alcohol, guns plus military conscripts trained to use them.

In this case in particular, Police displayed competence: The Turku assailant was stopped by a quick shot in the leg, mere minutes after starting his stabbing spree. During a press conference following the spree, police were careful about disclosing investigative findings prematurely.

But Minister of the Interior, Mrs. Paula Risikko immediately blurted out that the suspect was “foreign looking”. Nice.

 

 

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more super stories


Title image by Quinn Dombrowski

The post Absolutely Socking: Finnish FB group against human rights gets flooded with socks appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Thomas Nybergh

Brexit chlorine chicken: screenshot from Youtube

Thanks to the less than strong and stable negotiation position of International Trade Secretary Liam Fox (Conservative), the UK could face lower food standards post-Brexit.

 

 

As the UK prepares for stumbles towards an existence outside the EU regulation and partnerships, shoppers will have to prepare for GMO crops and hormone fed meat flooding the market. This appears to be fine with Liam Fox, who’s been very dismissive of the prospect of Englishmen eating chlorine-washed chicken.

In celebration of this, one youtuber shows off their video editing skills by making an advert for the lovely concept of chlorinated chicken.

The only upside of the forthcoming piss-poor trade agreements bringing lousy meat into the UK, is of course that more sane people may consider lowering their meat consumption. As a sidenote, that’s easier than ever thanks to meat-like products like Quorn, from a UK based company.

Cropped screenshot of Orwellian chicken farm, UKIP propaganda, 2016

Cropped screenshot of Orwellian chicken farm, UKIP propaganda, 2016

We find this particularly fitting with the current political landscape, which has hanged over Britain like a perpetual rainy autumn since David Cameron tossed himself and his entire nation in the dustbin of post-colonial history.

 

 

Namely, we remember that the nitwits at the UKIP comissioned a comically lousy cartoon featuring an EU regulated, dark and miserable chicken farm from which the birds free themselves by running towards the Utopian greenery outside.

Chicken conspiring to get out in the sunny non-EU, UKIP propaganda video 2016

These cheery chicken can’t wait to renegotiate everything that makes a modern economy run.

That is, despite a scary looking, big-nosed EU politruk behind the curtain trying to keep the chickens inside the farm. He fails despite all manners of musical and water-based special effects.

Got more interesting brexit-themed video material? Let us know in the comments below.

 

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more super stories




The post Chlorine Chicken: parody ad highlights Liam Fox’s food safety indifference appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Thomas Nybergh

Brexit chlorine chicken: screenshot from Youtube

Thanks to the less than strong and stable negotiation position of International Trade Secretary Liam Fox (Conservative), the UK could face lower food standards post-Brexit.

 

 

As the UK prepares for stumbles towards an existence outside the EU regulation and partnerships, shoppers will have to prepare for GMO crops and hormone fed meat flooding the market. This appears to be fine with Liam Fox, who’s been very dismissive of the prospect of Englishmen eating chlorine-washed chicken.

In celebration of this, one youtuber shows off their video editing skills by making an advert for the lovely concept of chlorinated chicken.

The only upside of the forthcoming piss-poor trade agreements bringing lousy meat into the UK, is of course that more sane people may consider lowering their meat consumption. As a sidenote, that’s easier than ever thanks to meat-like products like Quorn, from a UK based company.

Cropped screenshot of Orwellian chicken farm, UKIP propaganda, 2016

Cropped screenshot of Orwellian chicken farm, UKIP propaganda, 2016

We find this particularly fitting with the current political landscape, which has hanged over Britain like a perpetual rainy autumn since David Cameron tossed himself and his entire nation in the dustbin of post-colonial history.

 

 

Namely, we remember that the nitwits at the UKIP comissioned a comically lousy cartoon featuring an EU regulated, dark and miserable chicken farm from which the birds free themselves by running towards the Utopian greenery outside.

Chicken conspiring to get out in the sunny non-EU, UKIP propaganda video 2016

These cheery chicken can’t wait to renegotiate everything that makes a modern economy run.

That is, despite a scary looking, big-nosed EU politruk behind the curtain trying to keep the chickens inside the farm. He fails despite all manners of musical and water-based special effects.

Got more interesting brexit-themed video material? Let us know in the comments below.

 

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more super stories




The post Chlorine Chicken: parody ad highlights Liam Fox’s food safety indifference appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Thomas Nybergh

Eastern Pasila, Helsinki in grey June weather, 2014

Here in Finland, summer is highly anticipated as a time for restoring sanity after months and months of bleak, terrible fall, winter and no spring to speak of. However, the weather of June, July and August just doesn’t always add up to what one would expect of a great summer.

Luckily, there are upsides to everything. In theory, at least. Let’s explore some of the, well, arguably sunny side of bad Finnish summers.

 

Jeremy Clarkson getting water pured on him in a car
1. There’s no need to compensate for poor availability of “unnecessary” air conditioning

 

 

Salatut elämät character on a vespa

2. You have a perfect excuse to travel abroad

 

finnish hobbyhorsing

3. You can invest time and effort in esoteric indoor sports to gain a competitive advantage

 

4. Fewer tourists will be jamming up the bike lanes

 

5. Deck chairs are dangerous anyway

 

6. With a cold early summer, there will definitely by less of a mosquito problem, too

 

Laura Palmer on video display, from the original Twin Peaks series

7. You might have more time to catch up on good movies and tv

 

This is the water. And this is the well. Drink full and descend. The horse is the white of the eyes and dark within.

8. There’s a ton of good, relaxing podcasts and radio too

 

 

girl phone creepy

9. You can wrap yourself in a blanket and read creepypasta ghost stories

 

Bird stealing Landstalker SUV in modifier GTA V

10. Fewer picnics will be ruined by thieving birds

 

11. There’s less of a sinking feeling if you don’t have a proper vacation

 

Leaves falling

12. Best of all, you’ll hardly notice when summer’s all over

 
Got more that will cheer us up? Let’s hear it in the comments section below.
 

 

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more super stories


Title photo by Thomas Nybergh

The post No sunburns: 12 upsides of terrible Finnish summer weather appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Thomas Nybergh

Eastern Pasila, Helsinki in grey June weather, 2014

Here in Finland, summer is highly anticipated as a time for restoring sanity after months and months of bleak, terrible fall, winter and no spring to speak of. However, the weather of June, July and August just doesn’t always add up to what one would expect of a great summer.

Luckily, there are upsides to everything. In theory, at least. Let’s explore some of the, well, arguably sunny side of bad Finnish summers.

 

Jeremy Clarkson getting water pured on him in a car
1. There’s no need to compensate for poor availability of “unnecessary” air conditioning

 

 

Salatut elämät character on a vespa

2. You have a perfect excuse to travel abroad

 

finnish hobbyhorsing

3. You can invest time and effort in esoteric indoor sports to gain a competitive advantage

 

4. Fewer tourists will be jamming up the bike lanes

 

5. Deck chairs are dangerous anyway

 

6. With a cold early summer, there will definitely by less of a mosquito problem, too

 

Laura Palmer on video display, from the original Twin Peaks series

7. You might have more time to catch up on good movies and tv

 

This is the water. And this is the well. Drink full and descend. The horse is the white of the eyes and dark within.

8. There’s a ton of good, relaxing podcasts and radio too

 

 

girl phone creepy

9. You can wrap yourself in a blanket and read creepypasta ghost stories

 

Bird stealing Landstalker SUV in modifier GTA V

10. Fewer picnics will be ruined by thieving birds

 

11. There’s less of a sinking feeling if you don’t have a proper vacation

 

Leaves falling

12. Best of all, you’ll hardly notice when summer’s all over

 
Got more that will cheer us up? Let’s hear it in the comments section below.
 

 

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more super stories


Title photo by Thomas Nybergh

The post No sunburns: 12 upsides of terrible Finnish summer weather appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Thomas Nybergh

Midsummer sunset in Finnish lake landscape

When Finnish summer weather disappoints, there’s always pictures and the internet. We were contacted by young photographer Markus Watkins, whom we interviewed earlier this year, about his fun collection of summery activities shot taken in winter landscapes.

Markus wanted to share another set of his with our readers. Since the sky is grey at the time of writing, we can’t think of a single reason why we should turn down this set.

Scroll down for Markus’ dreamlike lakeside shots featuring the legendary Finnish midsummer almost-sunset.

We also suggest you read our interview, if you’re not already familiar with Markus’ work. Yon can also follow Markus on Instagram.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more super stories


The post Isn’t it too dreamy? Save your rainy day with stunning photos of Finnish lakeside midsummer sunsets appeared first on .