Ink Tank - Make words not war Thomas Nybergh

Caricature of Nigel Farage

British mainstream media like the BBC have given more than a fair share of visibility to characters like former UKIP leader Nigel Farage. Far-right populists, despite being given loads of screen time, must yammer to their base with tired old clishés about “Lugenpresse”, the “lying press”.

Mr. Farage is of course no exception, and yet again he so enthusiastically wanted to wage his war on the BBC, that he did that Internet-age equivalence of a public fart: holding up an easily photoshoppable sign. Like farting, an exploitable photo happens to all of us every now an then. But how bad it is, to quote George Carlin, depends “on who’s cooking”.

 


 

But just check this big and beautiful thing. As far as held-up signs go, this is top shelf material. It couldn’t be much wider if Mr. Farage wanted conveniently the hold it up by himself and fit it into a conventional photo.

 

Just compare it to the Dunkirk movie poster thing Farage did last summer. It may be a big sign, but it’s way less personal and enthusiastic.

 


 

 


 

So let’s investigate what the internet came up with this time. In case you want to get in on the fun, find below a clean slate.

 


 

1. Bonus points for self deprecation here

 


 

2. Pointing out the obvious again, but someone has to make those first awkward dance moves

 


 
 

 

3. Here’s a little something to make Farage less vile

 


 
 

4. Have to admit, I find Morrisey annoying, although I like his take on the meat industry

 

P.S. Fellow non-fans of Morrisey might still enjoy Speedway, a song Spotify recommended to me. I find the drums super catchy.

 
 

 

5. Let’s not impose good sense on a man who has none

 


 
 

6. This one’s very unlikely unless Nigel ran into some “Malkovich Malkovich” kind of bad trip

 


 

 

 
 

7. This one suits any guy with a shit-eating grin

 


 
 

To explore Mr. Farage’s history of bad judgement with signs, look no further than our previous post on the subject.




Title photo by Donkeyhotey

The post Seven Signs of the Times: Nigel Farage mocked after irresistible Photoshop bait appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Aleksi Linna

Finnish girls, screenshot from Youtube video by Aleksi Himself

 

In this article, we’re joined by prolific Youtube personality Aleksi Himself, aka Aleksi Linna who explains the inns and outs of the Finnish dating scene. Read on for a look into Finnish love life. Check out Aleksi’s channel for useful knowledge of Finnish life and culture.


 

 

 

How to date a Finn part I – women

Meeting and dating Finnish women doesn’t have to be a series of awkwardly misfortunate moments. The Finnish media is currently reporting that singles outnumber partnerships, so what’s the problem?

 

1. Finns are indecisive with Romance

Is it an overused generalization that Finnish men are too reserved, or are Finnish women just too beautiful, hence unapproachable? Where are some good spots, other than bars, for people to meet the opposite sex and form an attraction… especially for people who are shy by nature?

 

2. You can meet a Finn anywhere. After all, you’re in Finland

But when presented with a good setting for encounters, is there a lack of action? What constitutes the right setting for an appropriate ice-breaker? Are random encounters too infrequent?

I believe many Finns love it when you break their monotonous, everyday routines with an unexpected compliment in public. Only a handful of people are bold enough to shatter norms that give you an immediate upper hand in the dating pool.

 

3. Questions! Questions! Where should Finns start?

Well, what do Finnish women want? How do they like to be approached? I set out on a mission to answer these lingering questions by gathering some basic field research.

The evidence based on direct questioning points to Finnish women’s distaste for the insincere, humorless flirt — but don’t despair! There are other things men can do to capture a potential mate’s attention:

 

 

With these tips of the trade from real Finnish women your dating life is sure to improve!

 


 

How to date a Finn part II – men

In this tireless topic of dating in Finland, I also wanted to examine men.

What are men doing wrong? Is it all about the first move, and if so, why aren’t women helping the overly generalized “shy guys” by approaching them with uncomfortable compliments in public?

 

 

 

4. Even Finnish guys appreciate women who make the first move

When done properly, first-movers display confidence which Finnish men find sexy. Personally I love it when women approach me first, and I will surely give them credit for bravery!

 

5. You just can’t go wrong with humor

Finnish men also seem to favor a more romantic encounter rather than a cheesy bar oneliner, with humor being the winning trait on both sides of the gender scale. So women, don’t wait for someone to approach you! Check out what these guys had to say about meeting girls and what they find attractive.

 

 

6. Don’t be scared, it’s only dating…

 

 

Edited by Michele Lawrence.




The post Arctic Amour: 6 hot tips on how to date a Finn appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Stina Henriksson

Ice swimmer looking happy

Every nationality has their own identifiable characteristics no matter how stereotypical they may sound. As a Finn I hardly recognize these behavioral traits in myself until I’m outside my home country, Finland. With this list you’re sure to never mistake a Finn for anyone else again, especially while traveling or residing abroad…


 

 

1. At first you won’t even spot us because Finns know how to lay low on the communal radar — virtually undetectable. You won’t hear us voicing loud opinions on public transportation.

 

2. But Finns are surely there. We’re super punctual. If an event starts at 10:00 a Finn will be there at 9:40. Tip: If there’s coffee, make it 9:20.

 

 
A digital wristwatch
 

 

3. Finns are the grumpiest looking people in the group. Finns tend to have unreadable facial expressions all while avoiding excessive smiling. If we’re excessively smiling it’s most likely because you just told an inappropriate joke. We love questionable humor. Dark winters = dark humor?

 

4. Finns can be spotted awkwardly hovering around the coffeemaker drinking hideous amounts of coffee, no matter what time of day it is. It’s a way of staying awake during those dark winter months, and a habit we cannot switch off while abroad.

 

A cup of coffee

 

5. Apart from finishing our coffee before you, Finns will also finish their alcoholic beverages before you. A moderate drinker to Finns is a person with a problem to others. Be careful when you challenge a Finn to drink — you will lose and most likely be humiliated.

 

 

A glass of whiskey

 

6. Don’t expect an extended amount of emotional small talk. Finns often answer in short and honest bursts after a momentary ponder. Alternatively, we will tell you our whole life story when asked: “how are you?” This is more rare than the first scenario and likely involves booze.

 

7. Finns look unfazed by chilly weather. If it’s above -20C then you won’t see Finns commenting on the cold. You will learn to stop asking us if we’re cold because the answer is always going to be “no.

 

Finnish winter trees

 

8. But when it’s actually cold Finns are really good at dressing themselves. We’ve got all the right clothing for that. There’s no shame in wearing double layers of grandma’s wool mittens, scarves and/or sweaters…layering like a maniac is a must. It should take you over 20 annoying minutes to undress once you’ve come inside, or you’re not dressed warm enough.

 

Wool sweater

 

If you happen to mistake someone for a Finn abroad even with this helpful list, then you failed. But hey, it’s a good start and they’re probably an awesome person anyway.

 

 
Edited by Michele Lawrence




The post 8 surefire ways to spot a Finn abroad appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Thomas Nybergh

FEBRUARY 29, 2009 - Ski Jumping : Price ski competision at Okurayama Jump Stadium on February 29, 2009 in Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan. (Photo by Tsutomu Takasu)

Let’s talk ski jumping toddlers. Joel Willans, author of the best-selling book 101 Very Finnish Problems, discusses winter sports and other outdoorsy stuff with former semi-professional ski jumper Jussa Lauhamaa. Co-host Thomas Nybergh is curious about Jussa’s job involving the Sports Tracker app and wearable tech for active lifestyles.

Contact: veryfinnishproblems@inktank.fi

Produced by Thomas Nybergh / Ink Tank Media

 

 
Shownotes:

Jussa being sporty on Sports Tracker

Jussa on Instagram

Jussa’s hometown of Rovaniemi

Ski jumps as part part of the Lahti cityscape

Ski jumping

Finnish sporting goods conglomerate Amer Sports

“Brought to you by Carl’s Jr.”

Why Thomas prefers iPhones despite them being crap in the cold

Jussa Lauhamaa

 

Download or subscribe

You can get the show as a direct download.

Get all new episodes automatically by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.

Apple Podcasts / Soundcloud / Stitcher / TuneIn / AcastGoogle Play / RSS

 

About the show

What’s so weird and wonderful about Finland? British born Joel Willans, creator of Very Finnish Problems, discusses, with a variety of fascinating guests, what he’s learnt after 15 years living in his much-loved, adopted country.

Follow Very Finnish Problems to get all our stuff.

Facebook / Instagram / Twitter




Title photo by Tsutomu takasu

The post Episode 7: When the whole country is on ski break and you can’t ski appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Thomas Nybergh

FEBRUARY 29, 2009 - Ski Jumping : Price ski competision at Okurayama Jump Stadium on February 29, 2009 in Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan. (Photo by Tsutomu Takasu)

Let’s talk ski jumping toddlers. Joel Willans, author of the best-selling book 101 Very Finnish Problems, discusses winter sports and other outdoorsy stuff with former semi-professional ski jumper Jussa Lauhamaa. Co-host Thomas Nybergh is curious about Jussa’s job involving the Sports Tracker app and wearable tech for active lifestyles.

Contact: veryfinnishproblems@inktank.fi

Produced by Thomas Nybergh / Ink Tank Media

 

 
Shownotes:

Jussa being sporty on Sports Tracker

Jussa on Instagram

Jussa’s hometown of Rovaniemi

Ski jumps as part part of the Lahti cityscape

Ski jumping

Finnish sporting goods conglomerate Amer Sports

“Brought to you by Carl’s Jr.”

Why Thomas prefers iPhones despite them being crap in the cold

Jussa Lauhamaa

 

Download or subscribe

You can get the show as a direct download.

Get all new episodes automatically by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.

Apple Podcasts / Soundcloud / Stitcher / TuneIn / AcastGoogle Play / RSS

 

About the show

What’s so weird and wonderful about Finland? British born Joel Willans, creator of Very Finnish Problems, discusses, with a variety of fascinating guests, what he’s learnt after 15 years living in his much-loved, adopted country.

Follow Very Finnish Problems to get all our stuff.

Facebook / Instagram / Twitter




Title photo by Tsutomu takasu

The post Episode 7: When the whole country is on ski break and you can’t ski appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Julie Anderson

There are countless reasons to love JK Rowling. One is her peerless ability to destroy the increasingly fantastical Brexit fantasies peddled on Twitter.

Previously she stepped into the debate to shut down a Brexiteer who blamed Remainers for the failing EU negotiations. Now, she’s displayed that skill in fine style against Leaver luvvie and Conservative MEP, Daniel Hannan, by showcasing the glaring flaw in his shockingly bad and utterly unverifiable Brexit analogy.

Clearly unimpressed by Hannan’s ability to predict the future JK Rowling’s responded.

Rowling 1 Union Jack pom-pom boy 0




The post JK Rowling destroys Brexit cheerleader’s breathtakingly bad Brexit analogy appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Thomas Nybergh

Nigel Farage having a drink in 2017

It’s impossible to miss that Great Britain loves its pubs. A lot of personality of a neighborhood, town or the owner of an establishment can be expressed in the form of a name.

Since the Brits are about to embark on a great mission to isolate themselves, what better way tp take back ownership of the country than to name pubs in Brexit’s dubious honor? None, we think.

The good folks of Twitter came up with some fantastic suggestion under the #SuggestNamesForABrexiteerPub hashtag.

 

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Title image by Steve Bowbrick

The post The Misled Pleb: The 34 best pub names for Brexit Britain will leave you thristy for a beer appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Thomas Nybergh

Young children playing in the snow

Joel Willans, creator of Very Finnish Problems and author of the best-selling book 101 Very Finnish Problems, chats with clothing industry activist and sci-fi writer Rinna Saramäki about the evils of the clothing industry. Thomas Nybergh, co-host and producer of the show, is skeptical about ethical consumerism and likes his sci-fi bleak and dystopian.

Contact: veryfinnishproblems@inktank.fi

Produced by Thomas Nybergh / Ink Tank Media

 

 
Shownotes:

Rinna’s blog (in Finnish)

Rinna’s books (in Finnish)

Why ethical consumerism isn’t enough

Rinna’s book pick: Emmi Itäranta’s critically acclaimed “Memory of Water” (Teemestarin kirja)

Joel’s book pick: “The Day of the Triffids” by John Wyndham

Rinna didn’t like the movie adaptation of “Valérian and Laureline”

What does “Jumping the Shark” mean?

New York Times’ Review of Thomas’ dystopian book pick, P.C. Jersild’s “After the flood”. Jersild’s “A Living Soul” is also awesome.

Joel’s pick: “Z for Zachariah” by Robert C. O’Brien

Rinna’s pick: “The Windup Girl” by Paolo Bacigalupi

Worldcon 75 took place in Helsinki this year

Kuoriaiskirjat, a cool small Finnish book publisher

Osuuskumma, another cool small publisher of cool Finnish fiction. Some books translated to English and Spanish

Joel Willans with clothing industry activist and Finnish sci-fi author Rinna Saramäki

Joel Willans with Finnish clothing industry activist and sci-fi author Rinna Saramäki.

 

Download or subscribe

You can get the show as a direct download.

Get all new episodes automatically by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.

Apple Podcasts / Soundcloud / Stitcher / TuneIn / AcastGoogle Play / RSS

 

About the show

What’s so weird and wonderful about Finland? British born Joel Willans, creator of Very Finnish Problems, discusses, with a variety of fascinating guests, what he’s learnt after 15 years living in his much-loved, adopted country.

Follow Very Finnish Problems to get all our stuff.

Facebook / Instagram / Twitter




Title photo by Honza Soukup

The post Very Finnish Problems Episode 6: When your children need to wee after getting dressed for winter appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Kathleen Harris

Today British Prime Minister Theresa May tried to set out an upbeat vision for Britain’s future relationship with the EU in a speech at the Santa Maria Novella church in the heart of Florence, Italy. Sadly, the internet wasn’t quite as enthusiastic as she’d hoped about her new “have your cake and eat it” proposals.

 

 

 




The post 11 wonderful ways the internet lampooned Theresa May’s latest speech about Brexit appeared first on .

Ink Tank - Make words not war Thomas Nybergh

Yellow autumn leaf on the ground, photo by Tom Woodward

Finland’s climate is notorious for skipping long intermediary periods of warmish spring and fall. Summer turns to… something else pretty quickly. That somefthing else usually happens in September, in Finnish literally “Month of Autumn” (syyskuu).

If you’re out and about in Finnish nature during late September throughout most of October, you might witness ruska. That’s a Finnish word for autumn colored foliage. In many places over the world, ruska puts up quite the show.

But due to the long, dark winter in Finland, ruska really is last call for enjoying nature. Unless you like stumbling around in the cold and dark. Which is totally okay, we’re not judging.

In any case, we went scouting Flickr’s community for some ruska goodness. This writer also pillaged his own archive if Instagram snapshots, for your enjoyment. So, whether you prefer the great outdoors in urban streetscapes or out in the middle of nowhere, we hope we can remind you to at least enjoy a few more strolls outside before the long grey dark sets in.

 

1. If you’re in luck puddles or lakes might remind you to look up at the trees.

 

 

2. Lapland is stunning during ruska.

 

3. But so are all the lush suburbs all around the country. This view is from a high-rise building in Vuosaari in Helsinki.

 

4. I prefer staying in my inner city hoods, around Kallio and Vallila. But not because of some pretense of hipness…

 

5. …but because it’s going to retain a sense of place when ruska is over and fall is at its worst.

 
 

 
 

6. To each their own. But the point is: nature lovers, don’t waste a minute of this.

 

7. Anyway, you can’t get this in the cities.

 

8. However, nothing will stop you from enjoying wild cloud formations wherever you can see the sky.

 

9. Seriously, these skies are quite something.

 
 

 
 

10. Let’s cut the BS though, we were talking about autumn colors, ruska.

 

11. Again, available wherever they haven’t cut down the trees.

 

12. Autumn colors are caused by the process during which chlorophyll levels decrease in leaves.

 

13. Chlorophyll, the bringer of greenery, and an essential component of photosynthesis, is replaced by cork cells as sunlight and wamth decreases.

 

14. Eventually leaves drop. Without photosynthesis, they’re redundant. So, unless you have matching facades, get your nice photos taken while the leaves haven’t yet fallen.

 
 

 
 

15. Eventually, the end result is this: naked trees, with leaves in a slowly decomposing brown mess.

 

16. Luckily, some trees stay green.

 

17. So, if you notice moments post August 15 that pass for summer, be mindful and savor them.

 

18. One week, you’ll be out and about and enjoying everything about your surroundings.

 

19. Then, it’ll suddenly get rainy, in a way that just feels chilling.

 

20. And before you know it, you’ll just forget to enjoy your everyday surroundings. Moving outdoors becomes a tiresome chore, one which requires preparation.

 
 

 
 

21. Sure, those August and September sunsets are quite something.

 

22. They almost make you appreciate the looming darkness.

 

23. But by early November, a handful of pretty sunsets are among the few outposts of sanity you’ll have left. In Helsinki, you’ll miss the show if you don’t leave work between 4 and 5 pm. Farther up north, any typical office gig will leave you out of daylight.

 

24. With my brain chemistry, only something like this furball can force me to leave the house while there’s light around noon on November weekends.

 

25. But of course, outdoorsy people will crawl the forests for some last edible berries or mushrooms.

 

26. Or they’ll be using their inexplicable energy, to take some last sips of whatever magic takes place at summer cottages.

 
 

 
 

27. Make no mistake, to take a photo like this, you’ll need to get our in the middle of nowhere and be prepared for the freezing cold as soon as you’re not in direct sunlight.

 

28. Here, a regular human just sees a weird big rock, maybe with some understanding that the ice age dragged it there. Outdoorsy folks probably measure it up as potential shelter or whatever.

 

29. Personally, I prefer everyday scenes like these, and muttering about things like ugly elevated highway bridges.

 

30. Luckily I can get dramatic shots like this one just a fifteen minute walk away from my house.

 

31. Again, with the clouds.

 
 

 
 

32. And I much prefer to spend the silver hour on my way home.

 

33. When darkness falls, I want to be real close to home.

 

34. This is the kind of nature sightings I like in fall: old NYC style taxis with campaign stickers for Dick Nixon.

 

35. Anyway, time to head out before everything looks like this.

 

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more stories about super Suomi

 

Thomas Nybergh is a writer and producer for Ink Tank Media in Helsinki. He’s really into topics like information security, but he writes about anything. Occasionally, Thomas gets around to sharing photos on Instagram.

Thomas also co-hosts and produces a podcast based on Very Finnish Problems, the social media sensation.




Title image by Tom Woodward

The post Ruska relief: 35 stunning photos of Finland’s autumn colors appeared first on .